Hands-on Embedded Linux
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Introduction
  • Linux features and characteristics
    • Protected memory
    • Processes
      • Foreground vs. background
    • Users and Groups
    • Root User
    • Graphical desktop environment—KDE
  • File Systems
    • Root filesystem
    • Priveleges
    • Links
    • “Mounting” filesystems
    • Filesystem  Hierarchy Standard (FHS)
      • Special places
  • Development Environment
    • Configure the host
    • Configure the target
      • Flash File Systems
    • Network Filesystem (NFS)
  • The Shell
    • Redirection and Pipes
    • Keyboard shortcuts
    • Scripting
  • Eclipse
    • Creating and building C projects
    • Our first program
    • Debugging with Eclipse
Embedded Application Programming
  • A simple simulation environment
    • Thermostat example
  • Multi-processing vs. multi-threading—Pthreads
    • Threads
    • Mutexes
    • Adding settable parameters to thermostat
  • Device drivers -- moving hardware access to kernel space
    • User space view of I/O
    • Miscellaneous devices
  • Network programming
    • Sockets
    • Client/Server Paradigm
    • Networked thermostat
    • Multiple monitor threads
    • Embedded web server
  • Using the LCD display
    • Console and framebuffer drivers

TuxLinux, the free, Open Source operating system, is rapidly emerging as the leading platform for embedded devices using high-performance, 32-bit processors. And as the cost of computing continues to plummet, these processors are showing up just about everywhere. The ARM architecture, featuring a relatively high performance-to-power ratio, has become popular in a wide range of consumer and industrial electronic products including cell phones, set-top boxes and robots to name just a few.

This 3-day seminar focuses on how Linux has been adapted for use in embedded environments, with specific emphasis on the ARM architecture. Through extensive hands-on lab work, you learn how to install a cross-development environment, build a compact version of Linux for an embedded device, install the build on the target system, and test its operation. You’ll create and test programs that exercise I/O as well as networking applications.

Each participant receives a CD with a complete Linux kernel distribution, including source code, and ARM cross-development toolkit, which provides an ideal platform for embedding Linux into a wide range of consumer and industrial devices.

Participants will have available for use during the class an ARM-based target single-board computer (SBC) kit. This is the same SBC supplied with the Embedded Linux Learning Kit and is offered at a substantial discount to class participants.

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Copyright 2015 Douglas Abbott